Bransom, TX

a discussion place for our web site


You are not connected. Please login or register

BOTD 03-31-13 Connor's Confession - A Kat Production

View previous topic View next topic Go down  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Skater


Bransom Postmaster

Connor’s Confession


A Kat Production

Your twelve-year-old son Connor surprised his mom with a beautiful gold heart-shaped locket for her birthday. Though the locket is 14 karat gold, you are not really surprised, as you know he has been saving money from his allowance and from the odd jobs he does around the neighborhood. Also, he tells you he bought it at a secondhand store, where it was marked at a very reasonable price.

Connor 12
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

His mom is delighted with the gift and proudly wears it and shows it off everywhere she goes. Tonight Connor asks if he can speak to you alone. You tell him to go on up to his room and slip up a few minutes later. When you ask him what’s on his mind, he tells you,

“Dad, I didn’t have enough money for the locket, so I stole it. The lady had taken it out of the case for me, and… well, it was $40 and I only had $30… and then she went to wait on someone else and the store was really crowded, so I just walked out with it. I wish I hadn’t taken it, but Mom loves it so much… and I’m afraid if she goes to that store wearing it… I don’t know what to do.”


_________________
Can you dig it?
http://www.malespank.net/listAuthor.php?author=Skater

AFinch


Sherrif
Connor gets some mitigation for coming clean, but he's still in trouble.

He clearly knows right from wrong, and has a conscience, so I've (mostly) been doing something right. He also doesn't want to upset his mother who loves his thoughtful, if ill-gotten, gift, and if possible, I'd like that to happen as well. If she finds out its provenance, it's very likely that she'll no longer love it or wear it.

We're going to have the conversation about honesty and stealing again. Is this a unique necklace? That is, if his mother goes to the store wearing it, will it be immediately recognizable? If so, Connor and I will return to the store where he will make a full confession and apology, and we will pay for the necklace. He already has thirty dollars; I'll make up the rest and deduct it from his allowance. Hopefully, the shopkeeper/owner will be understanding, and that part of the problem will be obviated without having to involve his mother.

If it is not a unique necklace, and if we live in a sensible community where we have some relationship with the store, we will do the same thing. If we live in a modern police state, we will instead send a money order for the amount and a note.

Either way, he's stolen, and lied, at least until his conscience got the better of him. I'm going to promise him a switching. After he goes outside, cuts a switch, and brings it back, I will commute his sentence to hairbrush. His honesty, albeit after the fact, is a mitigating factor, but the offense still calls for a scorching. Hopefully that bit of business can be taken care of while mom is out shopping.

David M. Katz


Marshall
AFinch wrote:Connor gets some mitigation for coming clean, but he's still in trouble.

He clearly knows right from wrong, and has a conscience, so I've (mostly) been doing something right. He also doesn't want to upset his mother who loves his thoughtful, if ill-gotten, gift, and if possible, I'd like that to happen as well. If she finds out its provenance, it's very likely that she'll no longer love it or wear it.

We're going to have the conversation about honesty and stealing again. Is this a unique necklace? That is, if his mother goes to the store wearing it, will it be immediately recognizable? If so, Connor and I will return to the store where he will make a full confession and apology, and we will pay for the necklace. He already has thirty dollars; I'll make up the rest and deduct it from his allowance. Hopefully, the shopkeeper/owner will be understanding, and that part of the problem will be obviated without having to involve his mother.

If it is not a unique necklace, and if we live in a sensible community where we have some relationship with the store, we will do the same thing. If we live in a modern police state, we will instead send a money order for the amount and a note.

Either way, he's stolen, and lied, at least until his conscience got the better of him. I'm going to promise him a switching. After he goes outside, cuts a switch, and brings it back, I will commute his sentence to hairbrush. His honesty, albeit after the fact, is a mitigating factor, but the offense still calls for a scorching. Hopefully that bit of business can be taken care of while mom is out shopping.

Kier has saved me several keystrokes. I have truly nothing to add.


_________________
Cleverly disguised as a responsible adult.
http://www.malespank.net/listAuthor.php?author=David+M.+Katz

1strappedboy


Sherrif
Amen!

John Boy


Sherrif
He will pay the 30 and the ten I will switch out of his bare butt.

http://www.malespank.net/listAuthor.php?author=John+Boy

Stone Man


Marshall
David M. Katz wrote:
AFinch wrote:Connor gets some mitigation for coming clean, but he's still in trouble.

He clearly knows right from wrong, and has a conscience, so I've (mostly) been doing something right. He also doesn't want to upset his mother who loves his thoughtful, if ill-gotten, gift, and if possible, I'd like that to happen as well. If she finds out its provenance, it's very likely that she'll no longer love it or wear it.

We're going to have the conversation about honesty and stealing again. Is this a unique necklace? That is, if his mother goes to the store wearing it, will it be immediately recognizable? If so, Connor and I will return to the store where he will make a full confession and apology, and we will pay for the necklace. He already has thirty dollars; I'll make up the rest and deduct it from his allowance. Hopefully, the shopkeeper/owner will be understanding, and that part of the problem will be obviated without having to involve his mother.

If it is not a unique necklace, and if we live in a sensible community where we have some relationship with the store, we will do the same thing. If we live in a modern police state, we will instead send a money order for the amount and a note.

Either way, he's stolen, and lied, at least until his conscience got the better of him. I'm going to promise him a switching. After he goes outside, cuts a switch, and brings it back, I will commute his sentence to hairbrush. His honesty, albeit after the fact, is a mitigating factor, but the offense still calls for a scorching. Hopefully that bit of business can be taken care of while mom is out shopping.

Kier has saved me several keystrokes. I have truly nothing to add.

Ditto and all that. Kier has done an excellent job of covering the points I thought of while reading the setup.

Kittykat


Deputy
I'm with everyone else.

kalico


Sherrif
Very Happy DITTO KITTY.......LOL


hugs kal

ivor


Marshall
I just hope his Momnever finds out the true story of how he 'acquired' the necklace.

To do that he's going to have to tough it out for the next day or so as he sure won't feel much like sitting down after I've used the hairbrush on him.

http://www.malespank.net/listAuthor.php?author=Ivor+slipper

Padraig


Trailboss
I'll join the club...

Jack


Admin
Connor is coming to me, confessing this, knowing that theft is illegal, and that breaking the law means picking a switch in our family. I'm going to remind him of that, but then I'm going to commute it for two reasons. First, because he did come to me, and I don't want his butt's safety to prevent that in the future. Second, because I think his motivating concern (both in stealing it and in coming to me now) is his mother's happiness, and I don't think there's any way to switch him without her finding out and wanting to know why.

That doesn't mean he's getting off free.

The most important thing to me is for Connor to figure out the different things he could have done to avoid this (like coming to me for a loan and extra chores). I will then call the store and find out how we can handle this. Hopefully, given the situation, the lady will settle for us paying for the item and banning Connor from the store.

Connor and I will also be dealing with this later. If he feels he needs a switching, we'll have to wait until Mom isn't home. I'm pretty sure he'll be willing to 'settle' for a long session over my lap with the small, Lexan paddle.

http://bransomtx.forumotion.net

MemoryMan


Sherrif
I have to disagree with the previous posts. There will be no punishment for Connor beyond stumping up the $10 shortfall.

At $40 for 14 karat gold the chances of the necklace being unique and instantly recognisable are minuscule.

AFinch wrote:He clearly knows right from wrong, and has a conscience, so I've (mostly) been doing something right. He also doesn't want to upset his mother who loves his thoughtful, if ill-gotten, gift, and if possible, I'd like that to happen as well. If she finds out its provenance, it's very likely that she'll no longer love it or wear it.
Connor's conscience is troubling him and it makes me feel rather proud that he has trusted ME and has chosen to come to me as a friend in need. He accepts and regrets that he had done wrong and I have to ask myself what will punishment, or even a pedantic lecture on what he already knows, achieve beyond making him more reluctant to confide in me in future?

I'm going to act as banker and we'll work out a plan for (possibly anonymous) restitution to the shopkeeper and the repayment of the outstanding sum to me.

Thus Connor can continue to savour his mother's obvious enjoyment of his gift without any feeling of guilt.



Last edited by MemoryMan on Sun Mar 31, 2013 3:37 am; edited 1 time in total

http://www.malespank.net/listAuthor.php?author=MemoryMan

squarecutter


Sherrif
I will follow Kiers line as regards to the shop. Connor will work off the other 10 dollars. I guess it was the act of an impetuous boy

not to get the piece reserved and come me to borrow the other 10 dollars but he needs to realize just what trouble this can get him

into even with the best intentions. In the UK he would be on the cusp of taking criminal responsibility for this. The gloves coe off

when kids enter their teens.

I think switching might be mentioned but because he confessed it will be a paddling but a very hard one.

Skater


Bransom Postmaster
We're going to the store and pay for the necklace. Connor's going to pay for this with his labor of the next few weeks. I will pass on the spanking in honor of his honesty.


_________________
Can you dig it?
http://www.malespank.net/listAuthor.php?author=Skater

Emlyn Morgan


Trailboss
Tricky one this. scratch

Jack


Admin
MemoryMan wrote:Connor's conscience is troubling him...

Maybe you're right, but if you read the scenario, half his reason for coming to you is that he's afraid Mom will wear the jewelry into the store and find out it was stolen. I'm not sure if that counts as 'conscience' or not.

http://bransomtx.forumotion.net

Sponsored content


View previous topic View next topic Back to top  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum