Bransom, TX

a discussion place for our web site


You are not connected. Please login or register

BOTD 09-06-2013 Cheeky Kerry - An Ivor Production

Go to page : Previous  1, 2

View previous topic View next topic Go down  Message [Page 2 of 2]

Kittykat


Deputy
Jack wrote:It sounds like a great idea, and Tommy did it, but it's well beyond my 'mechanical abililty'.  I teach the kids basic maintenance and trouble shooting, and that's about as far as this Dad can take it.
Don't feel bad Jack, unfortunately now that they no longer teach Auto shop in schools as a requirement (Here it's an elective) I was surprised how few guys were actually there when I was in it, though, probably not as surprised as they that I was, and that I knew what I was doing LOL. And with most cars now being computer operated, people don't take the time to learn, they just go to a mechanic.

AFinch


Sherrif
Kitty, I'm old, and it was an elective when I went to school. And an elective "academic" kids were not encouraged to take. I wish, in retrospect, that I knew anything about cars besides driving them. As it is, I'm lucky to find the hood release so someone else can fix my car. Even a, shudder the thought...girl LOL

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jnsYyMPJ8eM

The first way to lose a man
You've met a charming fellow and you're out for a spin
The motor fails and he just wears a helpless grin
Don't bat your eyes and say, "What a romantic spot we're in?"

Just get out, crawl under the car
Say it's the gasket and fix it in two seconds flat with a bobby pin
That's a good way to lose a man



Read more: Wonderful Town - One Hundred Easy Ways Lyrics | MetroLyrics

1strappedboy


Sherrif
Oh my!!! I'm still recovering from that clip; Her's 'n Her's towels indeed!!Razz 

That was priceless!!Laughing 

Jack


Admin
Kittykat wrote:
Jack wrote:It sounds like a great idea, and Tommy did it, but it's well beyond my 'mechanical abililty'.  I teach the kids basic maintenance and trouble shooting, and that's about as far as this Dad can take it.
Don't feel bad Jack, unfortunately now that they no longer teach Auto shop in schools as a requirement (Here it's an elective) I was surprised how few guys were actually there when I was in it, though, probably not as surprised as they that I was, and that I knew what I was doing LOL. And with most cars now being computer operated, people don't take the time to learn, they just go to a mechanic.
I was exaggerating a bit, Kitty.

When I was going up, I was out of town, and my car quit working. I poked around for a bit, found what was broking, took it off, and went to get a replacement. They tested to make sure it was faulty, and got me a new one and a belt for it. I took it back, replaced it, got a jump, and took off. That's how I learned how to replace an alternator.

I'm pretty sure that kind of trouble shooting wouldn't translate to rebuilding a car though. And you're sure right about the modern ones with all the computer crap built in. (If you want to hear an example of creative foul language, get Tommy talking about those).

http://bransomtx.forumotion.net

MemoryMan


Sherrif
My car repairing skills have long faded.  You see I have owned one of these crappy computer driven things for eleven years and have just traded it in.  My old car with 90,000+ miles on the clock had been regularly dealer maintained (annual service) and had never once let me down; it had cost me only for service and normally consumable parts, it still had its original battery and, marvel of marvels, exhaust.Very Happy 

It is the car of choice for taxi drivers in my part of the world and guess what, I've bought the latest updated version that hopefully will do me for the remainder of my driving days.

The make and model?  - You can see it following the Tour de France riders each July.

http://www.malespank.net/listAuthor.php?author=MemoryMan

Iconoclast


Trailboss
AFinch wrote:Kitty, I'm old, and it was an elective when I went to school.  And an elective "academic" kids were not encouraged to take.   I wish, in retrospect, that I knew anything about cars besides driving them.  As it is, I'm lucky to find the hood release so someone else can fix my car.  Even a, shudder the thought...girl  LOL
It was a mistake for "academic" kids not to be encouraged to learn to fix cars and other essential mechanical devices back when we were kids and still today!

It is an essential skill for civilized life even if you do not do it yourself, because, with knowledge, you can identify a shade tree mechanic and save 50 to75% on car and other repair.

Iconoclast

1strappedboy


Sherrif
You are SO right about that, Icono!! We (the academic track kids) were discouraged from any of those 'practical skills' type classes and I think many suffered for it.

I look on that aspect of my life as fortunate because, due to the fact we were farmers I had learned much in the way of hands on stuff and Alex had a passion for old cars and it was one of those things that he transmitted well to us boys. I mentioned this before in one of our BoTD's: He had a remarkable ability to teach and would do so with extreme patience. As long as I didn't slip up and say something he read as "smart arsed" he'd spend hours going over how to tear something apart and reassembling it, how it worked, why it was used, etc. As long as you didn't set him off (and that was the problem as something you safely said yesterday will earn a trip to the barn today) you were ok.

Jack


Admin
1strappedboy wrote: As long as you didn't set him off (and that was the problem as something you safely said yesterday will earn a trip to the barn today) you were ok.
Dmitri, that's the reason I have so much trouble with how I was raised. You could never tell when something would set one of them off. I hated spending time with Ralph so much that I avoided everything like that, though I was lucky enough to learn it from my grandfather, who was no great guy, but was a lot better than Ralph.

http://bransomtx.forumotion.net

1strappedboy


Sherrif
It was often difficult to be sure.  I admittedly had a propensity toward sarcasm and it bought me a lot of grief! Don't forget too that since the farm was his job it was impossible NOT to spend time; we were kind of forced together. Granted I fixed that by leaving right after graduation, but it was a LONG 6 years leading up to it!

I often likened being around Alex to walking about on mined egg shells; you never knew for certain what would set him off.  Something that he'd laugh at today may tomorrow be met with "get your *** to the barn and prepare yourself!".  You just never knew....

Sponsored content


View previous topic View next topic Back to top  Message [Page 2 of 2]

Go to page : Previous  1, 2

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum