Bransom, TX

a discussion place for our web site


You are not connected. Please login or register

BOTD 08-14-15 The Look of Daniel - An Ivor Production

View previous topic View next topic Go down  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Skater


Bransom Postmaster
The Look Of Daniel
An Ivor Production

You recently married the lady who you met a few months back through a dating agency. She has a 12 year old son, Daniel from her previous marriage. Her husband, Daniel's father died a couple of years ago. Daniel seems to have taken to you and accepted you as his new 'Dad' although he has not yet used that word when talking to you.

You know from talking with your wife that her first husband did spank Daniel when necessary. She though found it impossible to do so. She has made it clear that she would not object if you found it necessary to spank him. She says that Daniel knows she has told you this. You aren't sure if you could spank him and as he has proved to be a good kid the need has not so far arisen.

Today Daniel went off down the local park to play baseball with a group of his friends. He is not particularly sporty but this holiday he seems to have got in with a group who meet up down there most days to do various things. You are glad that he appears to be making friends and enjoying himself.

However, he hasn't come home when he should and after giving him some leeway you decide to go and find him. You see him sitting on some steps, looking very dejected.



[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]


You go and sit with him and after a while he haltingly and tearfully tells you why he doesn't want to come home. It turns out he took your prize possession a baseball signed by Babe Ruth, to the park for the game today. An older kid he didn't know came by, saw it and offered him $5 for it which he accepted. Afterwards one of his friends asked him where he got the money from and when Daniel told him, his friend explained exactly what he had done, adding that he'd better not go home as when he did he'd be getting the worst whipping of his life for sure.

When he's finished telling you the story, Daniel looks up at you through his tears and asks.

"How bad is it going to be, Dad?"


(With thanks to Kat for allowing me to use his MMSA story 'The Sandlot - A Different Ending')


_________________
Can you dig it?
http://www.malespank.net/listAuthor.php?author=Skater

Skater


Bransom Postmaster
Reminds me of a movie I think? Anyway because it's his first spanking from me it will be bare OTK with the small paddle I some how seem to have obtained


_________________
Can you dig it?
http://www.malespank.net/listAuthor.php?author=Skater

AFinch


Sherrif
Daniel seems to have accepted being spanked, and he certainly deserves to be. But as I've never spanked him before, and no one has spanked him for a long time, I think bare hand to bare bottom will be sufficient. I'd argue his look of dejection has nothing to do with fear, but with the shame of having disappointed me and deprived me of one of my most prized possessions. I'm going to make sure he, my son, knows that HE is way more prized than any baseball ever could be.

Kat


Editor Extraordinaire
As upset as he is, I'm not sure I could bring myself to punish. I think I might put my energy towards identifying the older kid who took advantage of his naivete so I can get the baseball back. If we succeed, then we'll talk about a spanking.

Kat

talebearer


Cowboy
Agree w/Kat. First thing is, "Let's see if you -- or we -- can dig out of this. Who was it?" Daniel can have the first approach, find out who it was (the kids in the park probably know, ask them, Daniel), refund the money, maybe with interest from his funds if he thinks needed, and get it back. If not, see about recovering something this valuable more officially. I'm sure the DA's office might see this as a form of fraud -- they probably do have a bunko squad, excuse me, consumer-fraud unit -- or something else. Certainly a Babe Ruth glove might have some incentive for an investigation and maybe more.

At least Daniel will learn that there are adult consequences, complicated ones, and this one is worthy of the full Dashiell Hammett. This is far beyond spanking territory, and it may make him think, in the future, that if a spanking can fix a problem, it's a lucky deal.

http://www.malespank.net/listAuthor.php?author=Talebearer

Jack


Admin
Caveat: I am not a baseball fan, so I'm trying to imagine how I'd feel if this happened with one of my big comic book collectibles. The thing is, the two just really aren't comparable - baseball is just too much bigger, making something like this so much harder to find.

Having said that, I'm probably going to tell Daniel that I am really upset, and he is trouble, but that I do love him and still love him.

The problem is really two-fold. First, he shouldn't have taken the ball at all. Second, even after he took it, he knew it wasn't his, so there's no way he should have taken it.

The two of us will go back, see if we can find the kid or who he was, and try to get the ball back.

Even if we do get it back, Daniel is getting a pretty hard spanking, but only after he and I sit down, talk about why he's getting it (I honestly hope I can give him the same spanking I'd give him if he'd just taken the ball to play with it, whether we get it back or not), and he and I decide together about what he deserves.

Honestly, as hurt and upset as I'd be by this, the most important thing is that I make this about Daniel, and what he needs.


_________________
"In the end, it's just a story. But if you ask me, it's all true."
http://bransomtx.forumotion.net

MemoryMan


Sherrif
First I'll be taking steps to identify the buyer, some of the other kids will no doubt know who he is.  Then I'll be visiting his home and, explaining the circumstances to parents attempt to buy it back, with a bonus for their co-operation.

If they refuse I'll have to accept the loss.  It was bought in good faith and the fraud idea wont float in the water.  I could indict my boy as a thief and start a stolen goods recovery process - but that isn't going to happen.

Daniel will have been with me all through and seen the trouble and distress he has caused.  If the operation fails then distressing though it may be its just the loss of a cherished memento.  Either way it wont materially affect my life, but it does open a can of worms that need to be addressed.

How genuine is Daniel's distress?
How well have we bonded?  Does Daniel respect me or does he merely obey?
Is the good kid image just superficial?
How much respect does he have for other people's property?
Has he any 'form'? - Have things disappeared from home before?

From the scenario things look hopeful and spanking may, or may not, be invoked in the ensuing investigation and sort out.

http://www.malespank.net/listAuthor.php?author=MemoryMan

squarecutter


Sherrif
I like Memory Mans answer . I also think whatever the outcome that Daniel has learned more of a lesson from this than a spanking could ever accomplish. I think if we werent bonded before this will do the trick

Kat


Editor Extraordinaire
MemoryMan wrote:If they refuse I'll have to accept the loss.  It was bought in good faith and the fraud idea wont float in the water.  I could indict my boy as a thief and start a stolen goods recovery process - but that isn't going to happen.

I'm not a lawyer, but I'm pretty sure that the sale of the baseball is not binding on me, even without prosecuting Daniel. As a minor, he shouldn't be able to sell property as valuable as the baseball any more than he would be able to enter into a binding contract. I do agree that fraud is a stretch, but the older boy surely took advantage of Daniel's ignorance. Most parents in that circumstance would be reasonable about returning the property; if not, the threat of a civil lawsuit might change their minds.

Kat

Y Lee Coyote


Cowboy
The whole scenario does not hold water.  Yes, I know it is just to present an idea but I'm bugged by it.

First, I poked about the web and find that a major league baseball goes for $20 and there is a HUGE range for Babe's signature on one.  The site I looked at said $1,000 to $10,000 and UP.  I saw others asking $60,000.  Even where on the ball it was signed affects the value for collectors.

Now, a prized possession just lying about the house.  It should have been in a case to protect it from dirty hands and dust.  If it were then the lad would have known that it was not to treat casually much less a ball for play.  If not, then it was just another ball -- one to play with.  And a high end ball should have been locked up just like Grandma's diamond ring which is not worth nearly as much.

His new friends told him he done wrong big time.  Where were they at the time and could speak up since they would have been in awe of Babe's signature?  Did the stranger just come by and offer to buy it?  But why would he sell since he brought it to play with?

Now, all that aside the most important thing is the relationship with the lad.  That must be protected no matter what else.  It would be worth trying to recover the ball.  High value sale for unreasonable price by minors probably are not enforceable.

Y.

http://www.asstr.org/~YLeeCoyote/

ivor


Marshall
In defence of my scenario, which I hasten to add are never supposed to be fully watertight.......

1) It does not say that he actually showed the ball to his friends or indeed that they played with it. There is nothing to say that he wasn't simply tossing it in the air in the park and was approached by the other boy then.

2) As for where it was kept at home, surely that is immaterial? Not everyone opts to keep their prize possessions under lock & key. If you take that argument to its logical conclusion then probably it should have been in a bank vault and then the scenario definitely wouldn't have occurred!

http://www.malespank.net/listAuthor.php?author=Ivor+slipper

Kat


Editor Extraordinaire
If we take the scenario back to The Sandlot era (around 1962 iirc), the ball's value would have been less, and so placing it on a display stand out in the open wouldn't seem quite so odd. I think with the movie as well as most botd scenarios, we have to suspend disbelief a bit.

Kat

Jack


Admin
For the record, I have an original oil painting displayed in my library, that is apparently worth a lot more than a baseball signed by Babe Ruth. The reason it is displayed, is because it brings me great pleasure to look at it. I would imagine it's rather the same with this ball.

Kat - the really fun thing, when you consider this set in 1962 instead of current day, is that you can imagine tracking down the boy, explaining to his dad what happened, then watching the older boy get the belt for taking advantage of a younger kid.

"Am I going to get whipped like that?" Daniel asks as the two of you walk home.

"No, I don't think you're ready for the belt yet."


_________________
"In the end, it's just a story. But if you ask me, it's all true."
http://bransomtx.forumotion.net

AFinch


Sherrif
An original oil painting would be a lot less "mobile" than a signed ball, but your point is well taken. I don't see any point in having a collector's item that spends all of its time in a bank vault.

Y Lee Coyote


Cowboy
Agreed a painting hung on the wall is very different from a baseball just sitting with a lot of other stuff.

THE LAD NEEDED TO HAVE BEEN TAUGHT THAT THE BALL WAS SPECIAL.  That requires two things. 

First, telling him.  Much simpler than keeping a three year old in line not to draw on the walls.  There are a lot of things kids are told not to touch -- car keys, liquor, tools and more.

Second, PROVING IT BY TREATING THE BALL AS SPECIAL by displaying it in a protected way such as a case.  Handling it carefully so as to preserve its value.

Think about what message is sent if it just sits on the desk and is played with constantly and is at risk of getting soiled by food and dirty hands and treated the same as trinkets and souvenirs.

You can't fault the boy if he was taught it was super special.


The change of era back fifty years probably does not change the relative value.  A $50,000 ball now is a year of a top rated college. $300 back in 1960 was the same. $5 for a ball now is under an hour of minimum wage work while back in 1960, it was 15 hours -- a lot more.

http://www.asstr.org/~YLeeCoyote/

Jack


Admin
Y Lee, first of all, as someone who makes his living from collectibles, I can tell you that you're wrong about the value of the ball. Collectibles are influenced by a LOT of variables, including the time the person has been deceased. The other thing is that you're making a mistake I see many people make today in a lot of areas: you're assuming that the way the world is now is the way it's always been. I can tell you that's not true. A lot of reasons for that is that 'collecting' (and thus collectibles) were seen as a bit of an oddity that long ago, as opposed to the investment many people see them as now.

The other thing is that you're telling a person how he has to treat his prize possessions, and that if he doesn't treat them that way, then there's no reason he shouldn't expect them to be stolen (which is what happened in this scenario, though known of us want to call it that). The LAD shouldn't have NEEDED TO HAVE BEEN TAUGHT THAT THE BALL WAS SPECIAL, to know that he shouldn't take something that belongs to someone else, and especially he should have known that selling it was wrong, whether it was special to the owner or not.


_________________
"In the end, it's just a story. But if you ask me, it's all true."
http://bransomtx.forumotion.net

Sponsored content


View previous topic View next topic Back to top  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum