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BOTD 04-05-2017 Locking-Up the Bike - An 18 Smacked Production

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Skater

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Bransom Postmaster
Locking-Up the Bike
An 18Smacked Production


This is Alex, your newly turned eight year-old son, on his brand-new bike that he got for his birthday. He was so proud of his bike and he promised you the sun, moon and stars that he would take care of it. You even gave him a chain and lock, so it would not get stolen. But, this is now the fourth time in six weeks that you saw it lying out on the front lawn of either your house or that of his best friend, Danny.

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The first time, you took away his bike for a day. Then, the next time, it was gone for three days. The third time he got a spanking on his bare bottom with your bare hand. You really thought that you had made an impression with that, but two weeks later, you once again saw the bike lying on the front lawn with no kids in sight. You have a hairbrush that was used on you when you were nine and had not come home from fishing on time. Is it too soon to see if this brush will help remind Alex about his promise to keep his bike safe? Or, is there another way to approach this problem?

What is the best way at this point to get Alex to lock up his bike and hide it in a garage when he is not using it?


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AFinch

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Sherrif
I don't see that escalating the punishment is likely to have a long term effect. 8 year olds have short attention spans and memories.

I'd think my approach would depend a lot on where I live. Where I grew up (in the stone ages), people didn't take bicycles out of other people's yards when people were at home. I always locked my bike at school or if I went to a park or shopping center (which, at 8, I wouldn't have been allowed to do anyway). If I live in crime central, that might be different.

I'm going to remind Alex that his bicycle was expensive and it is one of his, supposedly, most treasured possessions. I have given him the means to keep it safe (and I'm assuming I also had it registered with a stamped serial number at the local fire department). I'll tell him that it's now his responsibility--if it's stolen, I'm not replacing it. Ball's in your court kiddo.

David M. Katz

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Marshall
I am going to steal his bike.

I will take it and hide it away.

Alex: (In tears) Um, my bike's missing. I think it got stolen.

Me: Oh no! That's too bad. Did you lock it up like you were supposed to do?

Alex: (Still crying but looking sheepish) Uh, not really.

Me: Oh, that's just too bad. You should have locked it up. I guess it is gone forever now.

Alex: (Now wailing) Can you get me another one?

Me: Oooh, no can do, Buddy. Bikes are expensive and I can't afford one. Anyway, why would I get another if you can't take care of it?

I will let Alex stress and stew for about an hour and then come clean.

Hopefully the lesson is learned.


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StevieWeeks

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Trailboss
"Alex, if your bike gets stolen, I shan't be replacing it. There won't be any point in pleading or screaming because I just don't have another $300 to waste...


ivor

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Marshall
I like Katz's 'solution' as I really don't think a spanking is going to achieve anything. However, I'd leave it for longer than an hour (more like a day) before I returned it.

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Jack

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Admin
Connor and Curtis both received new bikes last year, and I didn't spend $100 on either of them. Part of the reason for that is because they'll outgrow them pretty soon, but part of it is that I don't expect boys that age to be incredibly responsible on things like that.

Like Kier, we all leave our bikes in our friends yards when we're visiting. My kids' friends mostly use the bike racks, but I don't think anyone locks them up during the day.

If the bike was really expensive for me, or if we live somewhere that bike theft in broad daylight is common, then I can understand the way I'm reacting. If those things aren't true (which they aren't for me), then I will just make putting the bike away one more chore for those boys, and I'll remind them every day, just like I do on the rest of the chore chart.


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MemoryMan

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Sherrif
ivor wrote:I like Katz's 'solution' as I really don't think a spanking is going to achieve anything. However, I'd leave it for longer than an hour (more like a day) before I returned it.

Ditto ....... but something more like three days for the deprivation to sink in.  On return I'll make it clear that if I find it unsecured again it will be gone for AT LEAST a week,

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squarecutter

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Sherrif
I go with Katz solution but then I think Jacks idea of having it on the chore chart when he gets the bike back is also good. Somehow we need to make securing the bike and keeping it out of the wet a routine. Perhaps the last point is more of an issue in the UK.

Jack

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Admin
squarecutter wrote:... keeping it out of the wet a routine. Perhaps the last point is more of an issue in the UK.

Well, here in Texas, as long as it's locked up three days of the year, it should be okay.


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kalico

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Sherrif
I'm dittoing squarecutter who went with Katz and jack...

LOL Jack that's too funny!



Hugs kal

18Smacked

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Cowboy
I will add that in the city of Phoenix, AZ, in an area I would not consider a "high crime area" there was a case on the news of a 29 year old man who punched a 8 or 9 year old boy in the face in front of witnesses so he could steal a bike quite like the one shown in this BOTD. I would not even fit on this bike, and be able to ride it, so I could never see stealing it, but, this shows how times have changed.

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AFinch

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Sherrif
18Smacked wrote:I will add that in the city of Phoenix, AZ, in an area I would not consider a "high crime area" there was a case on the news of a 29 year old man who punched a 8 or 9 year old boy in the face in front of witnesses so he could steal a bike quite like the one shown in this BOTD. I would not even fit on this bike, and be able to ride it, so I could never see stealing it, but, this shows how times have changed.

I grew up in a very safe upper middle class suburb of Los Angeles. When I was maybe 10-11, my best friend and I were riding our bikes at the mall (then an outdoor mall, subsequently enclosed) when we were attacked by two slightly older and bigger kids, who knocked us off our bikes, punched us, took the bikes (which we found 100 feet away, now with slashed tires). Nothing like that ever happened again. There are aberrations everywhere, but I don't think you can always live your life as though the worst possible thing that COULD happen was likely to happen.

Jack

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Admin
AFinch wrote:
18Smacked wrote:I will add that in the city of Phoenix, AZ, in an area I would not consider a "high crime area" there was a case on the news of a 29 year old man who punched a 8 or 9 year old boy in the face in front of witnesses so he could steal a bike quite like the one shown in this BOTD. I would not even fit on this bike, and be able to ride it, so I could never see stealing it, but, this shows how times have changed.

I grew up in a very safe upper middle class suburb of Los Angeles.  When I was maybe 10-11, my best friend and I were riding our bikes at the mall (then an outdoor mall, subsequently enclosed) when we were attacked by two slightly older and bigger kids, who knocked us off our bikes, punched us, took the bikes (which we found 100 feet away, now with slashed tires).  Nothing like that ever happened again.  There are aberrations everywhere, but I don't think you can always live your life as though the worst possible thing that COULD happen was likely to happen.

I wish there was a like button on our forum.


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18Smacked

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Cowboy
Jack wrote:
AFinch wrote:
18Smacked wrote:I will add that in the city of Phoenix, AZ, in an area I would not consider a "high crime area" there was a case on the news of a 29 year old man who punched a 8 or 9 year old boy in the face in front of witnesses so he could steal a bike quite like the one shown in this BOTD. I would not even fit on this bike, and be able to ride it, so I could never see stealing it, but, this shows how times have changed.

I grew up in a very safe upper middle class suburb of Los Angeles.  When I was maybe 10-11, my best friend and I were riding our bikes at the mall (then an outdoor mall, subsequently enclosed) when we were attacked by two slightly older and bigger kids, who knocked us off our bikes, punched us, took the bikes (which we found 100 feet away, now with slashed tires).  Nothing like that ever happened again.  There are aberrations everywhere, but I don't think you can always live your life as though the worst possible thing that COULD happen was likely to happen.

I wish there was a like button on our forum.


By no means was I saying that one can nor should isolate in an attempt to find refuge from outliers in normalcy. Those aberrations do randomly crop up anywhere and everywhere, and it is futile to even try to avoid them. I was only trying to say that the reality is that crazy things can happen wherever we are. Who would even think a grown man would steal a bike made for children under 10 years of age, never mind punching such a child in the face in order to steal it? It boggles my mind that this even happened, but sure enough, it did.

Had a boy about 13 year-old stolen that bike, even with the same violence, I wouldn't have thought twice about it. But hearing it was a 29 year-old man was what grabbed my attention. To quote a Bernie Gunther novel, "These are interesting times we live in." Jack, I do say you are quite right about the fact that anything can happen at any time.

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Y Lee Coyote

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Deputy
I was intrigued enough to search for the story.    The report is: <<reportedly punched a 10-year-old boy and then stole his bicycle.>>  There is an id given that states the prep is 18, 5'6" and 135# which is about the size of a average ten-year-old boy.  Thus he could have ridden off quite easily.   He has a rap sheet and the family did recover the bike.

http://www.abc15.com/news/region-phoenix-metro/west-phoenix/silent-witness-man-punches-boy-and-steals-his-bike-in-west-phoenix

Y.

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AFinch

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Sherrif
They must grow them bigger out west Y Lee. The "average" 10 year old according to my charts is around 85 pounds and 4'4" tall.

Y Lee Coyote

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Deputy
Oooops.  Embarassed Yes, I did mis-read the chart.  But a tallish one is 4'7".  See:
www.cdc.gov/growthcharts/data/set2clinical/cj41c071.pdf

Note that the perp is small according to the news article.

Y.

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AFinch

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Sherrif
Which is still nearly a foot shorter than the perp.

MemoryMan

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Sherrif
We seem to be obscuring the wood with a whole forest of trees here.

Surely the point is that is extraordinary difficult to thwart a determined professional thief most petty crime is opportunist. The trick to avoid becoming a victim is to deny the opportunist the chance of a quick easy lift.

e.g. Lock up your bike.

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18Smacked

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Cowboy
MemoryMan wrote:We seem to be obscuring the wood with a whole forest of trees here.

Surely the point is that is extraordinary difficult to thwart a determined professional thief most petty crime is opportunist.  The trick to avoid becoming a victim is to deny the opportunist the chance of a quick easy lift.

e.g. Lock up your bike.

Thanks for bringing it back, MM!

I think most all of us will give up our bike when directly confronted by someone bigger than us (in a generally safe area of town). But, it is what we do when the bike is unattended that might lull us into a false sense of security until that day when the bike is taken.

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Jack

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Admin
18Smacked wrote:
MemoryMan wrote:We seem to be obscuring the wood with a whole forest of trees here.

Surely the point is that is extraordinary difficult to thwart a determined professional thief most petty crime is opportunist.  The trick to avoid becoming a victim is to deny the opportunist the chance of a quick easy lift.

e.g. Lock up your bike.

Thanks for bringing it back, MM!

I think most all of us will give up our bike when directly confronted by someone bigger than us (in a generally safe area of town). But, it is what we do when the bike is unattended that might lull us into a false sense of security until that day when the bike is taken.

Not to be contrary, but, in my opinion, the real point is - what's reasonable to expect from an 8-year old, and how should he be dealt with when he doesn't meet those expectations.


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